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Why does your business need digital transformation

Healthcare technologies have changed how health is measured, managed and delivered. As the healthcare industry faces new challenges, these solutions are helping leaders to improve performance, increase collaboration across the systems and manage costs. As demands on organizations increase, healthcare technology can streamline processes, automate tasks and improve workflows at a scale that’s not possible for humans alone. As providers at hospital and health systems embrace value-based health reimbursement models, these solutions are helping healthcare professionals to improve patient care, create better experiences & reduce burnout

Disrupting  healthcare using design thinking

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1) The rise of on-demand healthcare

Healthcare technologies have changed how health is measured, managed and delivered. As the healthcare industry faces new challenges, these solutions are helping leaders to improve performance, increase collaboration across the systems and manage costs. As demands on organizations increase, healthcare technology can streamline processes, automate tasks and improve workflows at a scale that’s not possible for humans alone. As providers at hospital and health systems embrace value-based health reimbursement models, these solutions are helping healthcare professionals to improve patient care, create better experiences & reduce burnout

2) The importance of big data in healthcare

Big data aggregates information about a business through formats such as social media, ecommerce, online transactions, and financial transactions, and identifies patterns and trends for future use.

For the healthcare industry, big data can provide several important benefits, including:

  • Lower rate of medication errors – through patient record analysis, software can flag any inconsistencies between a patient’s health and drug prescriptions, alerting health professionals and patients when there is a potential risk of a medication error.

  • Facilitating Preventive Care – a high volume of people stepping into emergency rooms are recurring patients also called "frequent flyers.” They can account for up to 28% of visits. Big data analysis could identify these people and create preventive plans to keep them from returning.

  • More Accurate Staffing – big data’s predictive analysis could help hospitals and clinics estimate future admission rates, which helps these facilities allocate the proper staff to deal with patients. This saves money and reduces emergency room wait times when a facility is understaffed.

3) Treating patients with virtual reality

Ten years ago, telling people you could reduce their pain with a device similar to a video game would have garnered a lot of blank stares. In 2018, however, Virtual Reality (VR) is the pièce de résistance of digital transformation in healthcare. Its myriad of applications are profoundly changing the way patients are being treated.

Take pain management for instance. Up until recently, doctors were handing out opioids prescriptions like candy. Migraines? Postoperative pain? Here’s some OxyContin, Vicodin, or Percocet. As a result, the country is currently facing the worst drug crisis in American history, representing an economic burden of $78.5 billion a year.

Here’s the thing: millions of people are still struggling with chronic pain. According to the CDC, 50 million of U.S. adults had chronic pain in 2016. For them, VR is a safer, more efficient alternative to drugs. VR technology is being used not only to treat pain, but everything from anxiety to post-traumatic stress disorder, and stroke.

And that’s just a fraction of VR’s proven capabilities in the medical field. Other uses include, doctors and residents using virtual-reality simulations to hone their skills or to plan complicated surgeries. VR headsets could also motivate wearers to exercise and help children with autism learn how to navigate the world.

4) The growth of wearable medical devices

Another trend of the digital transformation in healthcare is companies collecting their own health data from medical devices, including wearable technology.

In the past, most patients were satisfied with undergoing a physical once a year, and only checking in with their doctors when something went wrong. But in the digital age, patients are focusing on prevention and maintenance, and demanding information about their health more frequently.

As a result, healthcare companies are being proactive by investing in wearable technology devices that can provide up-to-date monitoring of high-risk patients to determine the likelihood of a major health event. According to a recent report, the wearable medical device market is expected to reach more than $27 million by 2023, a spectacular jump from almost $8 million in 2017.

Some of the most common of these devices include:

  • Heart rate sensors

  • Exercise trackers

  • Sweat meters – used for diabetics to monitor blood sugar levels.

  • Oximeters – monitors the amount of oxygen carried in the blood, and is often used by patients with respiratory illnesses such as COPD or asthma.

Why does your business need digital transformation

Healthcare technologies have changed how health is measured, managed and delivered. As the healthcare industry faces new challenges, these solutions are helping leaders to improve performance, increase collaboration across the systems and manage costs. As demands on organizations increase, healthcare technology can streamline processes, automate tasks and improve workflows at a scale that’s not possible for humans alone. As providers at hospital and health systems embrace value-based health reimbursement models, these solutions are helping healthcare professionals to improve patient care, create better experiences & reduce burnout

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